Colóquios do Departamento


Ano Letivo 2017/2018


2º Semestre:


Cada Colóquio desta série faz parte de um dos ciclos seguintes:

1. The end of Nature

2. Trends and frontiers in Physics

3. Physics at the core of Technology

4. Paths and ways for a graduate in Physics


Docente responsável: Prof.ª Teresa Peña



CALENDARIZAÇÃO DOS COLÓQUIOS DO DEPARTAMENTO DE FÍSICA

2º Semestre, ano lectivo 2017/2018

DateSpeakerTitleAffiliationCycle
28-fevJosé Ignacio LatorreQuantum Disruption*University of Barcelona3
07-marMohamed Chaker; Jacques Bélair; George HelffrichPanel “Interdisciplinary Physics”INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, Montréal, Canada; Département de mathématiques et de statistique, Université de Montréal Canada; Tokyo Institute of Technology, Earth-Life Science Institute, Japan)4
14-marBruno Gonçalves

ITER: Challenges and the Portuguese Participation

IPFN, Physics Department, Instituto Superior Técnico3
21-marEugenia Chiappe

Linking Visual Motion to Locomotion

Laboratory of Sensorimotor Integration,
Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown
2
04-abrUbirajara van Kolck
The discrete charm of scale invariance in nuclear and atomic physics
Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay and University of Arizona
2
11-abrMarija VranicExtreme laser-matter interactionsGOLP IST2
18-abrKatharina LorenzAccelerators and fabrication of new materialsDECN, IST3
02-maiJoana de SáData Mining for Decision-Making - From disease forecasting to political argumentsDF, IST4
09-maiCarlos Silva;
Rui Coelho
Cutting core and edge physics in tokamak plasmas
IPFN, IST
2










*Jointly organized with the Physics of Information Colloquium




Quarta-feira dia 9 de Maio, às 16h00m

"Cutting core and edge physics in tokamak plasmas"



Speakers: Carlos Silva e Rui Coelho

Abstract:

Tokamak plasma physics is a challenging and vibrant field of research in the fusion community and presents numerous multidisciplinary challenges with the ultimate goal of understanding, controlling and achieving sufficiently high performance on a burning plasma in a future fusion power reactor. A high temperature and dense plasma in a Tokamak is easily prone to a wide variety of instabilities and transport phenomena that can limit the confinement of particles and heat inside the plasma core and potentially lead to intolerable amounts of power towards the device walls and disruption of the discharge. The self-regulation of the plasma discharge on all its scales and regions, from deep core to the interfacing plasma boundary, calls for an integrated approach to fully understand the mechanisms that regulate plasma confinement and stability.

In this seminar, we will present some basic concepts of the Tokamak operation, some seminal examples of plasma instabilities that can severely limit the plasma burn or potentially lead to disruptions and a characterization of the edge plasma together with the diagnostic tools relevant for edge instabilities and turbulence studies.



Quarta-feira dia 2 de Maio, às 16h00m

"Data Mining for Decision-Making – From disease forecasting to political arguments"


Speaker: Joana de Sá, DF/IST
Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Every day we generate large amounts of data. Just by going online or using our cell phones, we leave informative traces, the so called “digital breadcrumbs”, which can give away a lot of information about our individual actions. And, when this individual data is gathered and analyzed, it can be very revealing of both individual and global behavior patterns. At the S&P group we ask whether we can use some of these aggregated, anonymized data not only to know more, but also to make better decisions, both at the governmental and citizen levels.

During the presentation I’ll focus on how we are analyzing some of these “breadcrumbs” to detect the onset of epidemic diseases, such as the flu, to help predict how many people will show up at the hospital on a given day. I will briefly discuss how we can use similar tools to understand sexual behavior, track non-infectious diseases, and even help keep our politicians in check.



Quarta-feira dia 18 de Abril, às 16h00m


"Accelerators and development of new materials"


Speaker: Katharina Lorenz, DECN/IST, INESC-MN and IPFN

Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Ion beam analysis and ion beam modification techniques are powerful tools for the development of new functional materials. Ion implantation, in particular, is used extensively in semiconductor industry for the processing of silicon based devices for selective area doping and implant-isolation. In contrast, for the case of novel wide bandgap semiconductors such as group-III nitrides and metal oxides, the processes of implantation damage formation and its recovery during thermal annealing are still poorly understood. Recent studies of irradiation effects in different wide bandgap semiconductors such as GaN, Ga2O3 and MoO3 will be presented and opportunities for new applications of ion beam processing of these emerging semiconductors will be discussed. These applications range from electrical or optical doping to defect engineering and nanostructuring for (opto)electronic devices.


Quarta-feira dia 11 de Abril, às 16h00m


"Extreme laser-matter interactions"


Speaker: Marija Vranic, GOLP/IST

Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Using the most powerful lasers in the world, we can accelerate particles in a plasma, which may take us well beyond the current energy frontier. Apart from the tremendous potential for applications, having access to very energetic particles and extremely intense lasers at the same time will also allow to answer some of the long-standing fundamental questions. Can we boil the vacuum with a field much lower than the Schwinger critical field of electrodynamics? What is the maximum field that can stably exist? We will discuss QED cascades that can create vast numbers of electron-positron pairs seeded by a single electron in an intense field much lower than the Schwinger limit. This can be tested with next generation of laser technology.



Quarta-feira dia 04 de Abril, às 16h00m

"The discrete charm of scale invariance in nuclear and atomic physics"



Speaker: Ubirajara van Kolck, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay and University of Arizona

Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Nature is certainly not invariant under changes of scale. Phenomena and laws are characterized by parameters that determine their dimensions. However, while the complexity of some many-body systems may stem from a profusion of distinct scales, rich structures exist even when there is no more than one essential scale associated with *discrete* scale invariance. I will discuss how intrinsically quantum-mechanical structures with unique properties, sometimes labeled "Efimov physics", emerge in nuclear and some closely related atomic systems from a contact three-body force.




Quarta-feira dia 21 de Março, às 16h00m

"Linking visual motion to locomotion"


Speaker: Eugenia Chiappe, Laboratory of Sensorimotor Integration, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown
Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Locomotion produces a plethora of sensory and motor-related signals that are thought to be critical for the internal representation of movement and space. Our lab combines multiple strategies, from neurophysiology to modeling to behavioral analysis, to understand how these internal representations are formed, and how they control different aspects of visually guided locomotive behaviors.



Quarta-feira dia 14 de Março, às 16h00m

"ITER: Challenges and the Portuguese Contributions"


Speaker: Bruno Gonçalves, IPFN, DF/IST

Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Will we ever harness the energy of the stars on earth? ITER and future long duration fusion experiments are paving the way towards fusion energy in spite of the many technological challenges with a marked change from non-nuclear to nuclear technologies, the need to a better understanding of the underlying physics and a strong focus on the design, build and operation of future facilities like ITER and DEMO. IPFN nuclear fusion activities are strongly focused on contributing to this endeavour. Some examples of the challenges and contributions will be discussed.



Quarta-feira dia 7 de Março, às 16h00m

"Interdisciplinary Physics"

An international panel will present Interdisciplinary Physics through three illustrative cases: material science, biophysics and geophysics.

A discussion of current challenges and methods of research that connect different areas of knowledge will follow.


Panel:

Mohamed Chaker, INRS-Énergie et Matériaux, Montréal, Canada

Jacques Bélair, Département de mathématiques et de statistique, Université de Montréal, Canada

George Helffrich, Earth-Life Science Institute, Japan


Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Mohamed Chaker:

Pulsed Laser Deposition of Advanced Materials

A short description of INRS-EMT and of its infrastructure known as Infrastructure of Nanostructures and Femtoscience will be presented.

Then an overview the Pulsed Laser Deposition Technique (PLD) that allows nanomaterials and thin film synthesis will be given.

Finally, two strongly correlated oxides materials synthesized by PLD, namely vanadium dioxide and samarium nickelate thin films, will be discussed.


Jacques Bélair:

Heamatological regulation and Control

The production and control of blood cells in the circulation is a complex system with multiple feedback loops modulated by a number of cytokines.

A stage-structured model to understand the origin of the oscillations observed in a clinical setting expanded to explore optimisation schemes for chemotherapy will be presented.


George Helffrich:

Evolution of the Earth’s core and mantle

The silicon’s role in the evolution of the Earth’s core and mantle will be addressed.


Quarta-feira dia 28 de fevereiro, às 16h00m

"Quantum Disruption"


Speaker: José Ignacio Latorre, Full Professor (University of Barcelona)

Venue: Anfiteatro PA1, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Matemática, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

The field of quantum computation has experienced a number of brutal boosts in recent years and will become a key technology in the short future. Indeed, quantum computation brings the promise to outperform classical computers on some selected but extremely relevant tasks. We review recent progress in this quantum race.

.


1º Semestre


Cada Colóquio desta série faz parte de um dos ciclos seguintes::

1. The end of Nature

2. Trends and frontiers in Physics

3. Physics at the core of Technology

4. Paths and ways for a graduate in Physics


Docente responsável: Prof.ª Teresa Peña



CALENDARIZAÇÃO DOS COLÓQUIOS DO DEPARTAMENTO DE FÍSICA

1º Semestre, ano lectivo 2017/2018

Date<>SpeakerTitleAffiliationCycle
20-setArlindo OliveiraThe Digital MindPresident IST, INESC-ID1
27-setGernot EichmannShining light on hadronsIST, CFTP2
04-outUwe OelfkeFrom Physics to MedicineCancer Research Institute London, Head of the Centre for Cancer Imaging (CCI)3
11-outJaume SastreNuclear Spaces: Museums, Fun and BanalizationFC, CIUHCT4
18-outJosé Sande e Lemos
The Nobel Prize in Physics 2017: Gravitational waves and the LIGO detector
CENTRA, Physics Department, Instituto Superior Técnico
2
25-outVânia SilvérioMiniature laboratories: a new scientific research game for biomedical devicesINESC Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias3
08-novPedro AssisShowers from the far away UniverseIST, LIP2
15-novJochen Wambach*Matter under Extreme Conditions
Director, ECT* Trento2
22-novFilipa Mendes, Sebastião Rodrigues
(Debate)
Ionizing radiation and Health - Imaging and Exposure Biomarkers
DECN e C2TN, Nova Medical School, UNL
3
29-novTiago DomingosCan Physics solve the puzzle of economic growth?IST, President of MARETEC - Marine, Environment and Technology Centre1
06-dezDavid HilditchStrong Gravity and Numerical RelativityIST, CENTRA2

*Jochen Wambach was recognized as a member of the "Distinguished Lecturer” Program

Colloquium financially supported by CFTP

The lecturer Jochen Wambach has been invited by CFTP for a visit as a distinguished guest. He is the Director of ECT*. ECT* is a centre of competence that promotes coordination of European research efforts in nuclear physics and offers an advanced doctoral program in Nuclear Physics in a broad sense - from low energy Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Structure, to Quantum Chromodynamics and Hadron Physics, Physics of Matter under Extreme Conditions and Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and applications in Astrophysics. At the moment at ECT* Jochen Wambach is developing a new method to calculate real time properties of strong-interaction matter at high temperatures and densities, with impact in areas as Astrophysics and Particle Physics.

Summary of the talk:

What happens ultimately to matter upon heating and compression? This question relates to cosmological settings in the early universe and the physics of neutron stars. I will give a brief historical review on matter under extreme conditions, starting from theoretical observations in the 1960s and the problem they posed for Big Bang cosmology. With the advent of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), in which it was realized that hadrons consist of quarks and gluons, the situation changed. The quark-gluon substructure opened the possibility for a transition to a new state of matter in which quarks and gluons become deconfined and can thus traverse large space-time distances. In theory, a rich phase diagram has emerged which has many similarities with other substances but also distinct differences. The quark-hadron transition can be explored in collisions of relativistic heavy ions. These experiments shed light on the generation of the visible mass in the universe.




Quarta-feira dia 6 de dezembro, às 16h00m

"Strong Gravity and Numerical Relativity"


Speaker: David Hilditch, CENTRA, IST

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

The spectacular discovery of gravitational waves from merging black holes was the pay-off from a long chain of investment in both theory and experiment. I will explain the role that one of the links in that chain, the numerical solution of General Relativity, played in the discovery. I will furthermore stress the central position that numerical work now takes in our understanding of strong field gravity more generally.





Quarta-feira dia 29 de novembro, às 16h00m

"Can Physics solve the puzzle of economic growth?"


Speaker: Tiago Domingos, IST, President of MARETEC - Marine, Environment and Technology Centre

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

A central puzzle in the theory of economic growth is that essentially all of GDP (Gross Domestic Product) is paid to capital and labour, the conventional primary factors of production, but the change in these two factors leaves most GDP growth (i.e., economic growth) unexplained. Here we show that energy use, correctly measured, is the key factor in explaining this unexplained residual. This allows to understand the role of the successive industrial revolutions in creating economic growth, why growth in the more advanced economies has stagnated in the last decades (the so-called secular stagnation), the potential of the fourth industrial revolution to renew economic growth and how manage this revolution in the direction of sustainable development.



Quarta-feira dia 22 de novembro, às 16h00m

"Ionizing radiation and health: Imaging and exposure biomarkers"


Speakers:

Filipa Mendes, DECN

Sebastião Rodrigues, Nova Medical School, UNL

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR), essentially from a diagnostic or therapeutic nature, has been steadily increasing over time. Medical radiation exposure was approximately 0.54 mSv in 1980, rising to 3.0 mSv in 2006 in the USA, whereas exposure from natural sources has remained constant at approximately 2.4 mSv. In this presentation we will present an overview of the use of IR in Nuclear Medicine and present several case studies particularly in imaging and targeted therapy of cancer.

Although most of these medical procedures have benefits, there are others for which the benefit is not clear or has not been quantified, and therefore the assessment of their potential benefit-risk ratio is needed. Thus, we will also discuss the need for sensitive biomarkers to assess the biological effects of low doses of IR, and their applicability in several clinical (or emergency) contexts to assess exposure, effects or susceptibility.




Quarta-feira dia 15 de novembro, às 16h00m

Distinguished IST Lecture

"Matter under extreme conditions"


Speaker: Jochen Wambach

Affiliation: European Center for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas, Trento, Italy

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

What happens ultimately to matter upon heating and compression? This question relates to cosmological settings in the early universe and the physics of neutron stars. I will give a brief historical review on matter under extreme conditions, starting from theoretical observations in the 1960s and the problem they posed for Big Bang cosmology. With the advent of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), in which it was realized that hadrons consist of quarks and gluons, the situation changed. The quark-gluon substructure opened the possibility for a transition to a new state of matter in which quarks and gluons become deconfined and can thus traverse large space-time distances. In theory, a rich phase diagram has emerged which has many similarities with other substances but also distinct differences. The quark-hadron transition can be explored in collisions of relativistic heavy ions. These experiments shed light on the generation of the visible mass in the universe.




Quarta-feira dia 8 de novembro, às 16h00m

"Showers from the far away Universe"


Speaker: Pedro Assis

Affiliation: IST, LIP

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Cosmic Rays have been studied for more than a century and they provide valuable information about the highest energetic particles known to men. The Pierre Auger Observatory, the world's largest Cosmic Ray detector studies the rare particles by resorting to the showers they initiate when interacting with Earth's atmosphere. The knowledge of their nature as well as of the processes governing their interactions at extremely high energy are paramount to extract information on the sources and the propagation mechanisms. The different techniques used in Auger and recent results will be reviewed as well as the effort to upgrade the detectors.




Quarta-feira dia 25 de Outubro, às 16h00m

"Miniature laboratories: a new scientific research game for biomedical devices"


Speaker: Vânia Silvério

Affiliation: INESC-MN

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

Microfluidic technology usually, but not exclusively, aims at the miniaturization of laboratory bench-top technology to handle fluids and particles on a chip-scale device within submillimeter ranges. Microfluidic devices or Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices emerged in the 1990s and have been evolving and revolutionizing various aspects of science and engineering ever since.

Laboratory and consumer biotechnological applications are being shrank to a wide range of promising devices whose size is reaching less than 1 cm3 volume at lower cost, lower consumption of reagents and samples, faster diagnosis and higher delivery efficiency. The manipulation of fluids follows different strategies (sample/reagent actuation, mixing, separation, filtration, reaction, control, monitoring, detection, power supply, power conversion, etc.) depending on the final objective and available space for operation. Recent efforts focus on integration of e.g. micro-to-nanoelements, sensing, electronics or automation for high throughput and low-cost portable devices. Additionally, microfabrication strategies require strong collaborative and interdisciplinary efforts to provide unique and increased functionality for sample-to-answer compact platforms for intelligent systems design revolutionizing biological, medical or chemical applications.

This talk will address recent advances in microfluidic devices and their applications, the main challenges and technical questions needed to be tackled for device integration for true on-chip functionality from process start, for example sample preparation, to end product (e.g. drug discovery) or analytical result.





Quarta-feira dia 18 de Outubro, às 16h00m

"The Nobel Prize in Physics 2017: Gravitational waves and the LIGO detector"


Speaker: José Sande Lemos

Affiliation: CENTRA, Physics Department, Instituto Superior Técnico

Venue: Anfiteatro VA4, piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


Abstract:

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics was given to Rainer Weiss (MIT), Barry Barish (Caltech), and Kip Thorne (Caltech), for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves. It took one century to achieve this major discovery. In 1916, Einstein found gravitational wave solutions in the general theory of relativity, a theory of gravitation introduced by himself in the previous year. In the 1960s, gravitational waves started to be taken seriously, notably by Thorne, and in 1970 a Michelson interferometer with a laser source was proposed by Weiss as the perfect instrument to detect such waves. In 2002, LIGO, short for Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, started its first gravitational wave searches under the directorship of Barish, and after several significant upgradings, it detected the first signal of a gravitational wave. The historical incoming wave arrived on September 14, 2015, and was generated by the collision of two black holes of about thirty solar masses each at a cosmological distance. Since then and up to now LIGO has detected four more of such spectacular events, with the latter one being between two neutron stars rather than between two black holes. In this colloquium, the endeavour for the understanding of the physics underlying gravitational waves will be presented. It will also become clear why the events generating these waves detected by LIGO have to be cataclysmic collisions between black holes or neutron stars, with the collisions involving black holes probing purely the gravitational field, and the collisions between two neutron stars, shining in full power, probing concomitantly, through telescopes and other electromagnetic detectors, the full spectrum of the electromagnetic field. We will also realize that with the opening of the gravitational wave astronomy window to scan the Universe, a new golden age for experimental and theoretical gravitation will develop, and questions such as, can we go a step forward in fundamental physics and understand definitely gravitation in the strong field regime?, or, are there new bizarre objects to be detected and discovered?, or even, can we detect gravitational waves coming from the Big Bang itself?, ought to be posed. Indeed, although these are puzzling questions, currently they are not beyond all conjecture.



LIGO Hanford Observatory in Washington State


Quarta-feira dia 11 de Outubro, às 16h00m

"Nuclear Spaces: Museums, Fun and Banalization"


Orador: Jaume Sastre,

Investigador, Centro Interuniversitário de História das Ciências e da Tecnologia

Local: Anfiteatro VA4 , piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


ABSTRACT:

The silence of the childless and rusty rides of Prypiat’s amusement park, one of the most enduring symbols of Chernobyl’s devastated nuclear landscape, contrasts with the screams of joy at Wunderland Kalkar in Germany, an amusement park built on the site of a former nuclear power plant which was never put in use. There, visitors can enjoy a huge swing ride inside the cooling tower, decorated with mountains and a blue sky. Can nuclear technologies be fun? Since the 1950s, the circulation and social acceptance of nuclear technologies has not only been shaped and mediated by techno-utopian dreams of cornucopian abundance and the awe of technological sublime, but also by a playful familiarisation seeking to overcome resistance, distrust and fear of an apocalyptic future. In parallel with and in connection to the well-known cultural history of ‘nuclear fear’, the unexplored and long-lasting history of ‘nuclear fun’ is key to understand our past and present nuclear landscapes and politics.

This talk will deal with the role of ludic and participatory displays in shaping the cultural representation and the material proliferation of nuclear technologies through the case-study of the New York Hall of Science in the late 1960s and early 1970s, where a real nuclear reactor was planned to be put on display at the projected ‘Atomarium’.




Quarta-feira dia 4 de Outubro, às 16h00m

"From Physics to Medicine"


Orador: Uwe Oelfke,

Centre for Cancer Imaging (CCI), Head; Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR, London) and The Royal Marsden Hospital, Head

Local: Anfiteatro VA4 , piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


ABSTRACT:

The lecture will address pioneering research into the physics of cancer imaging and radiotherapy, leading to radical improvements in patient care with the creation of kinder and more precise forms of radiotherapy. Innovative techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiation therapy to guide and shape beams to fit the complex contours of tumours will be presented.

Combining strong magnetic fields of the imaging equipment to radiotherapy beams is a central challenge. The lecture will tell us how to use physics to solve this problem in one of the world´s most advanced radiotherapy machines, the MR Linac, owned by the ICR and the Royal Marsden. This world-leading technology together with software allows ultra fast adaptation of treatment to a degree of accuracy to match tumour movement to within one hundredth of a second.




Quarta-feira dia 27 de Setembro, às 16h00m

"Shining Light on Hadrons"


Orador: Gernot Eichmann, CFTP, IST

Local: Anfiteatro VA4 , piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


ABSTRACT:
Hadrons are bound states of the strong interaction, which we nowadays understand as the interaction of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Hadrons can come in many possible shapes: in addition to mesons and baryons there is growing evidence for tetraquarks and pentaquarks, and experimental searches for 'exotic' mesons such as glueballs and hybrids are underway. Even though high-energy scattering processes can be understood within perturbative QCD, explaining the properties of hadrons from first principles is difficult because they are subject to nonperturbative phenomena such as confinement, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and dynamical mass generation. A useful experimental tool to examine their quark-gluon structure is to use the electromagnetic interaction and "shine light" on hadrons to resolve their microscopic features. On the theory side, the development of nonperturbative ab-initio methods to QCD and hadron physics has gained traction due to computational advances. Examples for such nonperturbative approaches are functional methods, whose basic ingredients are QCD's n-point functions which enter in calculations of hadron masses, form factors and scattering amplitudes. Here I will take a journey through these topics and highlight some of the recent successes and open questions towards a combined description of mesons, baryons, tetraquarks and their structure properties from the same microscopic building blocks - the quarks and gluons in nonperturbative QCD.




Quarta-feira dia 20 de Setembro, às 17h00m

"The Digital Mind"


Orador: Arlindo Oliveira, Presidente do IST

Local: Anfiteatro VA4 , piso -1 do Pavilhão de Civil, IST - Alameda


ABSTRACT:

New technologies have been introduced in human lives at an ever increasing rate, since the first significant advances took place with the cognitive revolution, some 70.000 years ago. Artificial intelligence will one day make it possible to create intelligent machines and computational biology will one day enable us to model, simulate and understand biological systems and even complete brains with unprecedented levels of detail. From these efforts, new minds will eventually emerge. How will we create these digital minds? How will they change our daily lives? Will we recognize them as equals or will they forever be our slaves? Will we ever be able to simulate truly human-like minds in computers? Will humans transcend the frontiers of biology and become immortal? Will humans remain, forever, the only known intelligence in the universe?